Dr. John Lewis Myers ’72

Dr. John Lewis Myers ’72 died October 6, 2009, in a boating accident in Salis- bury Cove off Bar Harbor.

Dr. John Lewis Myers ’72 died Octo- ber 6, 2009, in a boating accident in Salis- bury Cove off Bar Harbor. He was a pas- sionate and seasoned mariner, a licensed captain with a sense of caution heightened by the drowning death of his son 20 years ago. The day he died, he had sailed his 23-foot boat 3 miles to a marina in Han- cock where it would be stored for the winter. He was lost while returning across Frenchman Bay in a 12-foot motorized skiff. His body was found two days later on the shore of Bar Harbor, wearing the life jacket he never went without. He was born on March 21, 1949, in Durham, N.C., grew up outside of Pittsburgh and spent summers in Salisbury Cove, as his family had for three generations. He pre- pared for college at Shady Side Academy in Pittsburgh and Sutton Valence School in Kent, England. At Bowdoin, he was a James Bowdoin Scholar, won an arts prize for his photography and won the Hiland Lockwood Fairbanks Prize for public speaking. In 1971, he won the Merck Index Award for excellence in chemis- try. He completed his coursework early, in the fall of 1971, and spent a year as a research assistant at Woods Hole Oceano- graphic Institution before graduating magna cum laude. He went on to graduate from Duke University School of Medi- cine in 1978. He completed his residency at Maine Medical Center in Portland, and began practicing general internal medicine at Spurwink Internal Medicine Associates in Cape Elizabeth (now called the Greater Portland Medical Group.) He retired from full-time practice in 1998 and moved to Bangor, where he served as the internal medicine provider at a satellite clinic for the Togus Veterans Administration Medi- cal Center until 2000. He also worked as an independent medical examiner for sev- eral local companies that provide services to the life and health insurance industries, before retiring in 2008. He loved pre- paring memorable, simple meals with vegetables from his garden and whatever he had gathered from the sea – lobsters, clams, scallops or crabs. He is survived by his wife of nearly 20 years, Grace Hough- ton; two sons, Shon and John; a daughter, Margaret; three sisters, Jessica R. Myers, Elizabeth R. Myers, and Margaret A. Myers. He was predeceased by a sister, Judith, and a son, Jamie Myers, who drowned off Cape Elizabeth in 1989.